Wisley Airfield plan concerns council highways department

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Surrey County Council has recommended that plans to build more than 2,000 homes on Wisley Airfield be refused

Artist impression of plans which have been formally submitted for 2,100 homes at Wisley Airfield

Plans for 2,100 new homes in Wisley have been criticised by the county’s highways department.

Correspondence sent out concerning the controversial proposals at the former Wisley Airfield have recommended that it be refused.

Surrey County Council’s highways department has recommended refusal on the grounds that the applicant has not yet demonstrated that the development is in a location that is, or can be, made sustainable from a transport point of view.

It also has yet to be convinced that traffic generated by the development, which would sit next to the A3, can be satisfactorily accommodated by the surrounding network. As well as more than 2,000 homes, the application includes a primary school, shops, offices, travellers’ pitches and sports facilities.

The county council has said it will continue to work with Guildford Borough Council and WSP, who compiled the traffic assessment, to analyse the transport impacts of the development.

Mike Murray, from Wisley Property Investments, said: “We welcome the constructive feedback from Surrey County Council regarding our proposals for a new sustainable community at Wisley Airfield, to help meet Guildford’s housing crisis.

“We are confident their suggested next steps and offer to continue to work with us, Guildford Borough Council and Highways England, in order to agree on the transport impact of the development, will result in a satisfactory resolution. The site already has direct consented access to the A3, is within a six-minute cycle ride of Effingham Junction railway station and we have proposed local highways improvement measures to stop rat running locally and significantly improve safety on the A3.”

More than 1,500 people have officially objected to the plans via Guildford Borough Council’s planning department, and a petition has attracted objections globally, with more than 126,000 signatures from around the world so far